denshahime:

ameeafuwar:

berndor:

yuffiebunny:

ego-x:

tastefullyoffensive:

Theory of the Pixar Universe by John Negroni [detailed version]

Previously: Disney Movies in Disney Movies

….my head hurts.

Holy… Shit… Mind… BLOWN!

I JUST SCREAMED

OH-MY-GOD!

FfffFFFFFFF

disnears:

Sister’s pair of ears.

gameraboy:

When I’m rumbly in my tumbly…

lostinaseaofsighs:

apocalypse—arise:

Disney’s Haunted Mansion | via Tumblr on We Heart It - http://weheartit.com/entry/136614468

lostinaseaofsighs:

apocalypse—arise:

Disney’s Haunted Mansion | via Tumblr on We Heart It - http://weheartit.com/entry/136614468

dizkidd1961:

#VintageDisneyland #monorail #mermaids #submarinelagoon

dizkidd1961:

#VintageDisneyland #monorail #mermaids #submarinelagoon

Anonymous: nope. that argument abt frozen is still wrong cause there are still other princess movies that didn't focus on romance. like mulan. or merida. emphasis on mulan cause ppl love forgetting WOC princesses

Brave was not produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios. It was produced by Pixar. And Mulan had a good deal of romance in it, don’t even play. Frozen focuses on female relationships. That’s why it’s important. The romance is an afterthought. Mulan is not like this.

bogleech:

gameraboy:

"A Sticky Situation" (1960) by Carl Barks

I like how advertising is literally still exactly as sexist as they’re joking about in this comic from 54 years ago.

Daisy Duck is my spirit animal.

the books weren’t written for children,

they were written for …the promise breakers.

(Source: savingpltravers)

chookypoow:

This is so cute ♥

(Source: Flickr / doudeli)

disneymoviesandfacts:

The word TRON (as used for the title of the 1982 movie) is also a debugging command in the BASIC programming language, meaning “TRace ON”. However, Steven Lisberger has stated in interviews that he took the name from the word “electronic”, and did not know about the BASIC command until later.

disneymoviesandfacts:

The word TRON (as used for the title of the 1982 movie) is also a debugging command in the BASIC programming language, meaning “TRace ON”. However, Steven Lisberger has stated in interviews that he took the name from the word “electronic”, and did not know about the BASIC command until later.

theentertayner:

One thing I forgot to mention. Beware of the Hitchhiking Ghosts!

theentertayner:

One thing I forgot to mention. Beware of the Hitchhiking Ghosts!

mydisneydaze:

So this is love…

mydisneydaze:

So this is love…

Walt’s Original Three

(Source: arendellesnowflake)

(Source: heartdisney)

disneymoviesandfacts:

The “pulsing” flicker in some scenes in the computer world in TRON were the accidental result of a mix up during production. Each B&W 65mm frame of the film was printed on 20”x16” Kodalith high contrast film as high contrast positives which were then used to print as high contrast negatives. These positives and negatives were then colorized and used in the film. The Kodalith was produced by Kodak in the necessary size as a special order and the film boxes numbered in order of each batch produced so that there was a consistent film speed if used in order. However, this was misunderstood by the Tron crew and they were used in any random order which resulted in some frames being brighter/darker than others and resulted in the flickers as the film speed varied. Once this was found out, the film was used in order of production to minimize the effect, but in the end the producers actually added in more flickers and “zinger” sounds to represent the computer world glitching as Steven Lisberger described it. However, he digitally removed them from the 2011 Blu-ray release as they were not in his original vision of the film and he believed they detracted from the quality.

disneymoviesandfacts:

The “pulsing” flicker in some scenes in the computer world in TRON were the accidental result of a mix up during production. Each B&W 65mm frame of the film was printed on 20”x16” Kodalith high contrast film as high contrast positives which were then used to print as high contrast negatives. These positives and negatives were then colorized and used in the film. The Kodalith was produced by Kodak in the necessary size as a special order and the film boxes numbered in order of each batch produced so that there was a consistent film speed if used in order. However, this was misunderstood by the Tron crew and they were used in any random order which resulted in some frames being brighter/darker than others and resulted in the flickers as the film speed varied. Once this was found out, the film was used in order of production to minimize the effect, but in the end the producers actually added in more flickers and “zinger” sounds to represent the computer world glitching as Steven Lisberger described it. However, he digitally removed them from the 2011 Blu-ray release as they were not in his original vision of the film and he believed they detracted from the quality.